Archive for the ‘Blog’ Category

Good diagrams of common equine dental problems

Wednesday, December 28th, 2016

I’m always looking for good ways to show the different dental issues that horses can have.  This illustration does a pretty good job of that.  Of special interest is wave mouth because it affects around 70% of all horses I see. The problem with wave mouth is that it gets worse with age – the teeth that are too long continue to get longer and the teeth that are too short continue to get shorter.  Eventually the teeth that are too short get weak and fracture. An overbite is a dental conformation abnormality in which the top molars are a little too far forward in relation to the bottom molars.  Since they don’t match up correctly, horses tend to develop large hooks on the first upper molar and the last bottom molar.  Step mouth is many times due to trauma to a tooth that allows the opposite tooth to overgrow and get too long.  Luckily, all of these conditions can be managed and many times corrected if horses start receiving dental care early enough in their life.

 

dentalpic4

Equine Dentistry: Wolf Teeth

Sunday, February 2nd, 2014

     Wolf teeth are small, shallow rooted teeth located just in front of the upper first cheek teeth and occasionally on the lower jaw. They erupt between 5-12 months of age and are found in both fillies and colts. Approximately 70% of horses will develop wolf teeth. They are often confused with canine teeth which are larger and located further forward in the bars of the mouth.

Since wolf teeth do not come into contact with other teeth, they are not used for chewing. According to fossil records, millions of years ago wolf teeth were similar in size to the rest of the cheek teeth and were used for grinding food. Back then, horses were small forest dwelling brush eaters, with all of the cheek teeth being smaller and narrower like those of sheep and goats. In these early horses there were seven functional cheek teeth in each row compared to the six in today’s horses.

Due to their location, wolf teeth can cause a painful response when they come in contact with the bit. It is standard procedure to extract wolf teeth to help prevent behavior issues such as head tossing, rearing, head tilting, and pulling against the bit.

David Warren, D.V.M.

Wolfteeth

Equine Skull Anatomy, interesting facts.

Monday, June 17th, 2013

anatomy

– Horses have 36-44 teeth; 12 incisors, 24 cheek teeth, 4 canine teeth (male horses), and up to 4 wolf teeth.

– Baby teeth are fully replaced by adults at 5 years of age.

– Horse’s teeth grow 1/8 inch each year.

– Young adults teeth are up to 4.5 inches long.

– The upper jaw is wider than the lower jaw.

– Horses chew in a side-to-side figure 8 pattern.

Checking mares at Wrights Quarter Horses

Monday, May 6th, 2013

Patti Jo Wright and I pregnancy checking mares at Wright’s Quarter Horses near Kenedy, TX. If you aint wearin pink, you aint doin it right!!! She and Don raise the best Blue Valentine and Joe Hancock horses around. Visit their website at http://bluevalentineheadquarters.com/

Texas Trail Challenge

Tuesday, February 19th, 2013

I had a great time visiting with the Texas Trail Challenge competitors last weekend at Parrie Haynes Ranch near Killeen.  Thanks to all of those who attended my equine dentistry presentation.

If you didn’t make it and are curious, visit their website at: www.texastrailchallenge.com

Great weather to have an outside job!!!

Tuesday, November 20th, 2012

A few photos taken while working on horses in the New Braunfels area.